About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 40
LANGUAGE
English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
and whispering that "this is beauty, this is humanity, this is america." >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. junot diaz is known to start convers
in pakistan this year while drastically increasing in yemen. according to the new america foundation, confirmed drone attacks fell to 46 from 72 in pakistan, while rising to 53 from 18 in yemen. the u.s. just recently admitted responsibility for a september attack in yemen that killed 11 civilians, including three children. rebels of the central african republic appeared to be on the verge of seizing control of the capital after taking at least 10 other towns. central african republic and president has urged foreign intervention from the u.s. and france to help him push back the rebel advance. the u.s. says it is a pact with its embassy as a precautionary safety measure. in india, a 17-year-old girl was gang raped has committed suicide after being pressured by police to drop the case and marry one of her attackers. the girl's death comes amidst growing national outrage over a spate of gang rapes ignored by india's police, including one on a public bus in delhi. on thursday, protests against rape in india continued nationwide. >> they are doing nothing about it. [indiscernible] it is
control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama has vowed to take action against gun violence in the united states following the shooting rampage that left 27 people dead, including 20 young children, in newtown, connecticut. all of the children are aged 6 and 7. the gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, shot his mother dead at their home before driving to the sandy hook elementary school and forcing his way inside. armed with high-powered rifle, two handguns and hundreds of rounds of ammunition, lanza shot up to first grade classrooms before taking his own life as pol
sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. sometimes we can see the universe in a grain of sand, as the old saying goes, but nowadays a graphic chart more vividly reveals the world we live in. take a look at this statistical snapshot of the media ecology that largely determines what you and i see, read, and hear. in 1983, 50 corporations controlled a majority of media in america. in 1990 the number had dropped to 23. in 1997, 10. and today, six. there you have it -- the fistful of multinational conglomerates that own the majority of media in america. what do we call it when a few firms dominate the market? oligopoly. doesn't quite rhyme with democracy. but today, believe it or not, big media is about to get even bigger, unless the public stands up and says "no!" here's the story. the chairman of the federal communications commission -- the fcc, the agency of government created by congress to protect the public's rightful ownership of the airwaves -- is reportedly asking the other four co
. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, sacred cow: defending america on a budget. (instrumental music) (marching music) >> the u.s. spent the last century fighting well-defined wars against well-heeled enemies. ♪ stop! >> duck and cover up under the table. first you duck and then you cover. >> but the fall of the berlin wall meant the collapse of the traditional enemy and the military struggled to find its purpose in this post soviet world. >> we have to understand the role that the united states has played since the end of the second world war and
critical for america to have good reputation to have good liaison with the muslim world. >> we do hope that the president could maybe visit a mosque or attend an american muslim institution and really show that direct engagement, that hey, listen, you are part of the american framework and part of the building of this country. >> we're cautiously optimistic that the obama administration will finally allow sikhs to service in the u.s. armed forces with their articles of faith in tact. it would be a very important and historic step. >> we'd like to see the obama administration take the lead in acknowledging and including non-theistic americans in the decision making process. >> pro-life issues are always a concern. someone has to protect the innocent life and certainly we think our government ought to be able to do that. >> i also really hope and pray that in the second administration he takes on the issue of climate change. i think that unfortunately it's become a politicized, highly contentious issue and that it's not and it's becoming more clear to us as the days go on that it's somet
a possibility. confidence in america will be shaken. the financial markets may take fright. president obama believes it is time for the wealthiest americans to pay more in taxes. he has made that part of his negotiating position. he criticized republicans for resisting these tax increases. >> they said the biggest party is making sure we deal with the deficit and a serious way. the way they're beating is their only priority is making sure that tax breaks for the wealthiest americans are protected. that seems to be their only overriding unifying theme. >> the republican party argues it is ready to deal. it is the president and democrats were not. >> there's no single issue that remains an impossible sticking point. the sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest, frankly, their courage to close the deal. i want everyone to know i am willing to get this done. but i need a dance partner. >> if republicans and democrats don't join the dance soon, america will enter the new year and a state of heightened political and economic uncertainty. congress can choose to put a stop to this as
. he should appear and confessed to the world that he committed these crimes so that america could show itself as democratic and fair. >> in a dramatic scene yesterday on capitol hill, several democrats walked out of congressional hearings on the contraception rule. carol maloney of new york criticized the panel at the hearing, which was exclusively male. >> what i want to know is, where are the women? when i look at this panel, i do not see one single woman representing the tens of millions of women across the country who want and need insurance coverage for basic preventive health care services, including family planning. where are the women? >> we are joined by sandra flu, the female would this not allowed to testify at the all male hearing on capitol hill yesterday. >> i was there to talk about the women whose voices have been affected by this policy, who have been affected financially, emotionally, and medically. what i wanted the members of congress and the public to hear is what a difference this policy could make to their lives. i wanted to talk about how birth control is not [n
,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and you done cover it because it's 34 separate occurrences around the country. and it doesn't grab the public's imagination, psyche, sympathy, there's just-- you don't get a visceral reaction when it's people you don't know and can't see. >> rose: have we got that now, the visceral reaction that this is somehow different because it children. >> i sure hope so i was asked today is it different with children. it is in the public psyche. but i think if you talk to the families of teenagers and even adults who were killed before the sympathyes with their loss is exactly the same as the parents of young people. but young people that people look and say oh my god what are we really doing here. >> rose: what is your criticism of the president of the united states? >> well, i don't know that criticism is the right word. i believe that his job is to lead. when you
they doing. you have america the most powerful nation in the planet and you have this guy. i take people behind the scenes to see whattate would be like to be an officer and what it would be like to be tracking osama, and me you did it. >> rose: kathryn bigelow and mark boal coming up. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> good evening. tonight i can roar to the american people and to the world that the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al-qaeda. and a terrorist who is responsible for the murder of thousands of innocent men, women and children. for over two decades, bin laden has been al-qaeda's leader and symbol, and continued plot attacks against our countries, friends and allies. the death of bin laden signifies the most significant achievement to date in our effort counterterrorisms professionals to work tire loalsly to achieve this outcome. the american people do not see their work nor know their names but tonight they feel the satisfaction of their work and the resul
so they can continue to do what they do. >> you know, we do exaggerate in america all the time. so now we are locavore, you know local food and now we get totally crazy with organic to the point where i have been to restaurants where they practically come and introduce you to the carrot. that carrot was born on the 7th of may, we named it hilda. we can get exaggerated. too. >> rose: great chefs for an hour captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: let me start off. tell me what makes -- what makes a great restaurant? how do you -- >> well, what makes a great restaurant i don't know exactly. a great restaurant i think is where the owner and the chef gives all the love he can. >> rose: when does your day start? >> ooh, sometimes 8:00, sometimes 9:00, sometimes 7:00. >> rose: what's the first thing you do? >> oh, it changes a little bit. i stop at the office for 15 minutes and then i go down and look if everything is holding and look -- >> rose: see i had this impression of all of you at the fish market at 4:00 a.m. e
had on yesterday's, author of "bloch: the rise of america's gun." i asked about senator feinstein's announcement that she will reintroduce the ban on assault weapons on the first of the senate. >> i will read the legislation very closely when it is out. i have to say i'm skeptical. the 1994 so-called assault weapons ban was one of the most porous, ineffective pieces of legislation that i personally have the opportunity to study. it was shot through with loopholes. it had no applicability to weapons that were made and sold on the day before enactment. and the fact it was coming for a period of years gave gun manufacturers an opportunity to run their factories overtime and to build up huge stockpiles of the weapons. so we will see. but if congress is not proposing to ban weapons that are already out there, then that leaves millions and millions of weapons already out there. >> that was paul barrett, author of "glock: the rise of america's gun." rebecca peters, if you could compare to the legislation that was passed in australia after the massacre, and also talked about the buyback a
philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you know, our music. >> rose: tell me about the music of venezuela. >> well, look, what we are bringing is the -- i think it is the most important piece right in venezuela, by michael estevez and a piece for a big choir, two soloist, a tenor and a baritone. >> a huge orchestra, you can feel what is about
beginning this sort of extra expectation. obama it is an american. he is from a country called america. for americans. anything which we get from that administration is a bonus. it is time the african nation stop relying on changes in administration elsewhere. as part of the movement away from the original. and so we should not expect any special treatment from the u.s. administration. on the contrary, a sense of belonging should encourage the leaders to try to make things easier. there are enough problems in the world. it is a young continent, if you like, in terms of what is happening elsewhere. they should be able to organize internally. the european union, the former soviet enclave. not reaching for handouts, not expecting special things. let's meet as equals. and collaborate. tavis: it is impossible to do justice to a conversation about africa in 30 minutes. you were able to do it in the pages of your text. it is called "of africa," written by the nobel laureate from nigeria, wole soyinka, and that is our show for tonight. things are watching, and as always, keep the faith. >> for
exists. >> i think america wonderfully celebrates the individual. i think you are very good at saying "i." "i like this." i think generally -- tavis: that was very nicely put. we're arrogant, just say it. >> no, no, i actually do not mean that. tavis: we're not "celebrating the individual." >> no, you do. tavis: we're arrogant and we're pompous. >> no, i think that -- look, i am english. you cannot get more arrogant than that, i mean, come on. i think english, you apologize about yourself. we have a level of apology, of kind of going, "i think this -- sorry, sorry i think this." tavis: yeah, yeah. >> there is a general kind of do not stick your head up too high because it'll get shot off, kind of type thing. so i think it is much easier for english actors to go, "oh, i do not want to play me, because i shouldn't be here, so i will play that person." i think there is something culturally within that that kind of makes us. i also think you come from a history of film. this is the place of film actors, and film actors are -- normally it is much closer to themselves, because you are working
of america's most famous modern generals. and more claims and successes who were involved in messier campaigns. he was himself the son of an army general, was a decorated vietnam veteran and commanded u.s. ground forces in the 1983. he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, was treated then campaigned to raise awareness of the disease. >> that's nick charles reporting there on stormen norman who died at age 78. this year has seen the arrival of a whole wave of films which are geared towards older audiences, one. films with older characters have been doing well around the world, especially in britain and the u.s., as tom brook reports from new york. >> it's a trend, old people in movies. next month there's a film called "quartet" set in a retirement home starring several british actors. meryl streep and tommy lee jones both succeeded in "hope springs" in what's being called a mid life romantic comedy. then, there was the best exotic mari gs gold hotel. it's been very profitable. the cost is $10 million to make and it's taken many more than $130 million around the world. the film was seen
believe in traditional values or morality or whether you're a post-modernist. you had the same america you had in 1972 when 75% of americans leave in homes where they're married. romney would have won in a landslide he. only 48% of americans are married and living in homes. when 53% of our babies that are now born to women under 30 are born out of wedlock, we're in deep trouble. >> for land the antidote to social problems is the return to religion. >> spiritual revival. i do not see us, the traditional values folks, winning this struggle without a spiritual revival that ripens into an awakening and culminating into a rep mags. the single greatest advantage, bob, that an american can have today and trumps all others is is to be born into a home with a mother and a father who stay married to each other. if you're born into such a home, it trumps religion. it trumps ethnicity. it trumps economic rank. it trumps iq. it trumps everything. yet, over half of our children have lost that home by the time they're 7. as far as i'm concerned, that's collective societal child abuse. >> land was very cl
in manil. to the americas we're watching a system pull off the east coast. the storm system did bring rough weather to the southeast. actually a tornado was reported in georgia. that's dissipating and pushing off to the east. expecting rain and a mix of freezing rain into the new england states as this continues to push off there. after that we have a break into the central plains around the ohio river valley. farther towards the west, you see this cloud cover here? that is the next series of storm systems. this has been hitting the entire rockies. in utah, 153 kilometer per hour winds were reported. not just that, we're also seeing heavy snowfall across much of this area and expect more in the next 24 hours in british columbia, over 20 centimeters can be expected here. even down towards south around wyoming, colorado, even over towards utah. some isolated areas could be seeing 60 centimeters of snowfall. we'll want to watch this throughout the remainder of the week. the same storm system as it spins up and off to the east, it will be bringing rough weather and blizzard conditions around th
to introduce the world to latin america and music? >> oh, absolutely, of course. but look, for us the most important thing is to put our music in the same level of how to say, of importance, as beethoven, as or nono, especially talking about modern composers. because when we talk about our music we are talking about music of the 20th century. especially 20th century and that is the important thing. can't you imagine, i was thinking this this is all new music for many people, you know. the concerts are sold out. you know, it's something very special because people are coming with this kind of question, you know, with this kind of what we will listen. but i think at the same time they think that will be something very special. and for us the most important thing is not of course it's the orchestra, but its music. how important is this music, to bring this music for people that are not close to that. >> rose: how was it founded? >> it was founded by maestro antonio, in 1975, i think, started as a program for young musician. we have a great organize tra in venezuela. this organize tra sim foni
election victory speech, he broke his silence on climate change, what it would do to america's children. he then subsequently said that he wants to be a global leader on climate change, but the position that has been taken by the united states in these talks is business as usual, has not reflected the urgency of what has just happened in the united states through hurricane sandy, the fact that there is massive drought in many parts of the country itself, and huge climate impacts happening in a world elsewhere. the bottom line is, the politics of the negotiation is out of touch with all the science says, and president obama and other political leaders need to recognize, nature does not negotiate. we have to change. sadly, these negotiators are not reflecting that urgency and the ambition of the kind of change we need to see. >> i want to turn for a moment to my questioning of jonathan pershing. he was part of a news conference yesterday, along with other climate negotiators from around the world. i think the conference was called to meet the negotiators. this is what's the u.s. negotiator jo
first speech after elected, said that he didn't want our children to live in an america that is threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet. yesterday, a number of civil society groups held a news conference and they said -- greenpeace said that tod stern and got the pershing have come to doha with a goal of obstructing the process. he said that it was disrespectful of president obama to inflict on us to the bureau negative negotiators to act as if the commerce that he made after the election were never made. obama should pick up the phone and tell his delegates to follow his lead or alternatively return to washington. jonathan, are you calling president obama's wishes, and how you respond to thcivil sociy groups who say that the u.s. is the leader of stricter to any kind of negotiatied deal? >> all have no comment on the first part. on the second piece, the united states' role is engaging actively in the discussions. we are one of the significant triggers to the intellectual thinking in the process. we will continue to do that. it does not mean that we will
, they all say to me, america actually is poorest to be the world leader for another century. if we can fix some of this political dysfunction. and there are some very simple steps that we can take. number one, let's not raise taxes on middle class families. that's something we could do right now. number two, let's have a smart long term deficit reduction program that includes us doing some things right now that would help with job creation. number three let's not manufacture another debt ceiling crises and number four let's make sure that we're making the kind of investments in education and work force development, energy independence, infrastructure and research and development that ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> rose: tell me how you found the president. not in terms of the sort
it is a savior for america's economic -- >> that's why it was perfect for us because the stakes are so incredibly high so you want to put that pressure on which is the real pressure being put on these communities, high stakes poker that is a great place to set a story like this, who are we and where do we find ourselves today. >> rose: which is your story. >> exactly. >> what is the story? the story is matt's character, steve, comes into this small town and what we find out at the beginning of the movie is that steve's character is from a small town himself and actually had industry in that town, a caterpillar plant which shut down and just hollowed out the entire town financially and otherwise so he knows what these people are going through and how much they need financial help so he believes he is doing the right thing by going into these towns and offering them money to lease -- to drill on the land, and so then the town basically turns out to be a little more savvy and decide that that is not necessarily what they want, and then the debate begins. and my character is named dustin, and enviro
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)